Grayson family

Notes


Gustav Theodore Emmanuel LIND

Known as "Ted".  Born February 6, 1898.  Went to Alaska in 1944 to work on the Alaskan highway; he worked for the Herman Cole Construction Company of Ames, Iowa, in Valdez, 80 miles from Fairbanks, and saw black bears up there.

Died April 6, 1992, in Boone, Iowa.  
Lived at 409 College in Boone in 1954.
Lived the last few years of his life in room 105B at the nursing home,
112 W. 4th St., Boone, Iowa.
Buried in the Story Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Ames, Iowa.


Gustav Theodore Emmanuel LIND

Known as "Ted".  Born February 6, 1898.  Went to Alaska in 1944 to work on the Alaskan highway; he worked for the Herman Cole Construction Company of Ames, Iowa, in Valdez, 80 miles from Fairbanks, and saw black bears up there.

Died April 6, 1992, in Boone, Iowa.  
Lived at 409 College in Boone in 1954.
Lived the last few years of his life in room 105B at the nursing home,
112 W. 4th St., Boone, Iowa.
Buried in the Story Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Ames, Iowa.


Grace Elizabeth TIGNER

Address, 1991: 211 Harrison, Apt 1, Boone, Iowa 50036;
phone 515-432-1602.
Address, 1995: 3001 Regency Court, Apt 219, Ames, Iowa 50010;
phone 515-232-1355.

Address, 1991: 211 Harrison, Apt 1, Boone, Iowa 50036;
phone 515-432-1602.
Address, 1995: 3001 Regency Court, Apt 219, Ames, Iowa 50010;
phone 515-232-1355.


Claës Gustav LIND

Claus was born June 11, 1864, in Vetlanda, Sweden, and attended grade school
there 1871-1877.  In July, 1880 he started as an apprentice in a furniture
shop where he worked for three years.  He emigrated to the US March 26, 1883,
because he was about to be drafted into the Swedish Army for four years.  His
opportunity came when a Mr. Swan Carlson from Pilot Mound went to Sweden to
get farm workers, to be indentured for one year.  He arrived in Pilot Mound
on April 18, 1883.  He hired out to a farmer in that community and began at
once to take an active part in the Grant Center Congregation which is now,
Trinity Lutheran Church of Boxholm.  When he was 21 the church was built, and
he drew the plans for it and helped with the construction.  When Claus was 21
he drew the plans and supervised the building of Grant Center Lutheran Church
near Boxholm, Iowa, in Boone County, Iowa.  Then he farmed nearby until 1887
or 88, and went to Stratford, in Hamilton County.  There he managed a
furniture store and built caskets for C. J. Danielson, who had another
store in Dayton.  He met Anna Carlson in Dayton, and married her December 23,
1890.  He was superintendent of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Orphan Home
for 16 years at Stanton, Iowa, starting in 1892: all five children were born
during this period.  He managed another orphan home for two years at Vasa,
Minnesota.  They were very much interested in Sunday School and
congregational work, and both sang in the choir.  He went to the ``79 Ranch''
in Barber, Montana, for two years, for a Mr. Eklund, whose son still owns
the ranch, which is now called the Eklund Ranch.  Claus worked as a
carpenter, helped them build shacks, an irrigation system, and started a
lumber company.  The ranch was near the Musselshell River, where there was
sheep herding and sheep shearing.  Mr. Dawson was the ranch foreman.  They
had 18-28 Hereford bulls and three cowboys.  The log cabin they lived in near
Ryegate is still there.  In 1912 he came back to Dayton, bought a farm north
of town, and farmed until 1925, when they sold out and moved to town.  Anna
died November 8, 1932.  In 1935 he retired and moved from Dayton to Boone,
where he became a cabinet maker and painter.  He married Alice Wiley in 1938.
He was a faithful member of the Lutheran Church throughout his life.  He died
April 11, 1955, at home, 1728 Crawford Street, Boone, Iowa, and is buried in
the Dayton cemetery.

Rebecca Grayson has (1992) a dresser with a mirror that Claus built, which she
got from her mother, June.  She also has a silver set that used to belong to
her mother June on which is inscribed ``Complements of Manrelunds
Församling, to C. G. & A. Lind.''

Dan Grayson has a cabinet that Claus built.

We have a picture of the tombstone, and it looks like this:

LIND
ANNA CLAUS G.
    1859  1931       1864    1955


We have a copy of a letter in Swedish to Claus Lind dated June 12, 1885.

Dan Grayson's baby book has a family tree in it that lists Claus' father as Carl Wilhelm Lind.

Claus was born June 11, 1864, in Vetlanda, Sweden, and attended grade school
there 1871-1877.  In July, 1880 he started as an apprentice in a furniture
shop where he worked for three years.  He emigrated to the US March 26, 1883,
because he was about to be drafted into the Swedish Army for four years.  His
opportunity came when a Mr. Swan Carlson from Pilot Mound went to Sweden to
get farm workers, to be indentured for one year.  He arrived in Pilot Mound
on April 18, 1883.  He hired out to a farmer in that community and began at
once to take an active part in the Grant Center Congregation which is now,
Trinity Lutheran Church of Boxholm.  When he was 21 the church was built, and
he drew the plans for it and helped with the construction.  When Claus was 21
he drew the plans and supervised the building of Grant Center Lutheran Church
near Boxholm, Iowa, in Boone County, Iowa.  Then he farmed nearby until 1887
or 88, and went to Stratford, in Hamilton County.  There he managed a
furniture store and built caskets for C. J. Danielson, who had another
store in Dayton.  He met Anna Carlson in Dayton, and married her December 23,
1890.  He was superintendent of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Orphan Home
for 16 years at Stanton, Iowa, starting in 1892: all five children were born
during this period.  He managed another orphan home for two years at Vasa,
Minnesota.  They were very much interested in Sunday School and
congregational work, and both sang in the choir.  He went to the ``79 Ranch''
in Barber, Montana, for two years, for a Mr. Eklund, whose son still owns
the ranch, which is now called the Eklund Ranch.  Claus worked as a
carpenter, helped them build shacks, an irrigation system, and started a
lumber company.  The ranch was near the Musselshell River, where there was
sheep herding and sheep shearing.  Mr. Dawson was the ranch foreman.  They
had 18-28 Hereford bulls and three cowboys.  The log cabin they lived in near
Ryegate is still there.  In 1912 he came back to Dayton, bought a farm north
of town, and farmed until 1925, when they sold out and moved to town.  Anna
died November 8, 1932.  In 1935 he retired and moved from Dayton to Boone,
where he became a cabinet maker and painter.  He married Alice Wiley in 1938.
He was a faithful member of the Lutheran Church throughout his life.  He died
April 11, 1955, at home, 1728 Crawford Street, Boone, Iowa, and is buried in
the Dayton cemetery.

Rebecca Grayson has (1992) a dresser with a mirror that Claus built, which she
got from her mother, June.  She also has a silver set that used to belong to
her mother June on which is inscribed ``Complements of Manrelunds
Församling, to C. G. & A. Lind.''

Dan Grayson has a cabinet that Claus built.

We have a picture of the tombstone, and it looks like this:

LIND
ANNA   CLAUS G.
1859  1931        1864    1955


We have a copy of a letter in Swedish to Claus Lind dated June 12, 1885.

Dan Grayson's baby book has a family tree in it that lists Claus' father as Carl Wilhelm Lind.


Anna Cecilia CARLSDOTTER

Born July 27, 1859, in Sjorynge, Halland, Sweden; I can't find that town
on the map.  In Sweden, her name was
Carlsdotter, but in the USA it was Carlson.  She came with her parents to the US in the early 1880s (with 10
siblings), stopping in Brooklyn for a year.  She was a school teacher before
marriage, and was paid $22 per month, according to a letter in Swedish dated
1891 to Mrs. C. G. Lind.  Lived in Dayton, Iowa.  Died November 8,
1932, in Dayton, Iowa.


Naomi LIND

We have a letter in Swedish from Claus announcing the
birth of Naomi.  The letter seems to be dated March 5th
and refers to the birth on Tuesday, so the date of birth
might actually be Feb 27, 1894.
Died 1896.


Heinrich Christian KINNE

Born June 7, 1854, in Roklum, Saxony, Germany; the birth is recorded in the
old church books of Roklum now stored in Semmenstedt.  Baptised June 18.
Came to the US at age 14 with his parents.  Married May 5, 1887, to Emilie
Henrietta in Trinity Lutheran Church with Henry Kramer, August Abel and his
cousin Emma Preiss, as attendants.  Lived in Burnside, Iowa.  Emilie
remembers that her father was very religious, and went to church every
Sunday.  Died at home (6 miles northwest of Dayton, Iowa), on September 2,
1935, in Webster, Iowa.  Buried in Dayton, Iowa, beside his wife.  Also
buried there are Alwin, Johanna, Alma, Henry, Lydia, and Jimmy.

After their mother died in 1912, Johanna took over her mother's duties, and
Alwin devoted himself to helping out on the farm, too.  According to Emilie,
Johanna always made an angel food cake on birthdays, and everyone appreciated
it.  Johanna also played the organ at church for 32 years.  After their
father died in 1935, Alwin and Johanna continued to live on the family farm.

From a draft of his obituary: ``Mr. Kinne was a splendid member of Trinity
Evangelical Lutheran Church from the time of his moving into its territory.
Since 1870 he has been faithfully attending its services loyally assisting in
whatever Trinity undertook for its welfare, communed regularly at its altar,
had his name placed on the roster of voting members and cheerfully gave well
for the upkeep of congregation, church and synod.  He never missed a service;
he sang an attentive ear to the divine message.  His name appears among the
eight who in 1878 built their beloved church home.  He was also well known in
the Synod, because often chosen as a delegate to the conventions.  He read
his church papers assiduously and was a diligent reader of many worthwhile
books.  Above all, he read his Bible, started and closed every day with
devotion, perused his catechism time and again.  He meditated deeply upon
its precious contents and made these sweet and precious contents the firm
foundation and the faith and hope of Everlasting life.  He had the firm
foundation and the clear-cut attitude on all religious questions and issues,
a divine persuasion that could weather the most severe storm and calmly
encircling shadows of death itself.''


Emilie Henriette SEELEMAN

Born June 6, 1865, in Gräfenhainichen, Germany.  Baptised June 19.  Emigrated
to the US from Germany at age 12, with her supposed father, William
Reichenbach, who had previously been in America.  They settled in Fort Dodge,
Iowa, for a year, and then in Boone, where she attended the German Lutheran
church school.  Confirmed March 21, 1880, at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Boone, Iowa.

The birth record in the old church book in the church office in Gräfenahinichen
shows that she had no father, but the family has been told in the obituary, for
example, that her father was named William Reichenbach.  She lists Reichenbach
as her maiden name on her marriage certificate, I'm told.  Donald Kinne
remembers his grandfather Henry Kinne telling him that her maiden name was
Zander; her mother married Carl Louis Wilhelm Zander a year after she was born.

Her ``father'' left her before she was married, and went off to live in
Carroll, Iowa, and never came back.  Her mother never came over from Germany,
and we don't know why.  The children Henry and Emilie remember while they were
living at home, a black-bordered letter arrived from Germany for her.  They
conjecture that this was a notice of her mother's death.  [The information in
this paragraph is from daughter Emilie in a 1995 conversation with her daughter
Janice.]

Married May 5, 1887.  Though being of a frail constitution she enjoyed a fair
health during the greater part of her life.  Died in Fort Dodge, Iowa, of
tetanus, October 20, 1912.

Throughout her life she has been a devoted member of her church at the
services of which she was a regular attendant.  At the home it was her
constant care to have her children brought up, not only in a good secular
education, but preeminently in the fear and admonition of the Lord.

The Word of God having been her guiding star in life it was her staff and
final consolation during her great suffering from which she was delivered
amid the prayers of those near and dear to her when she passed from this life
to her heavenly home.

A woman named Marie Knittel has been corresponding with Emilie Mathilda Theresa
Kinne for years, and corresponded with Johanna Henrietta Amanda Kinne before
she died.  Presumably she is related to the Zander or Seelemann families in
some way.  Her address was Dimitroffstrasse 42, Gräfenhainichen, D.D.R. 445.
When Dan, Jan, and Lisa visited Gräfenhainichen in 1995 they were told that
Marie and Otto Knittel had died.  Here are the contents of one of the
postcards, dated May 3, 1974: ``Liebe Emilie.  Für Euch Alle ein Andenken aus
dem Geburtsort Eurer lieben Mutter.  Unsere Kirche ist heute noch im alten
Stil.  Allen wünsche ich Gesundheit und viele herzliche Grüße.  Mariechen.''
The picture on the front is of the interior of the old church in the city.
Another post card portrays the house of Paul Gerhardt in Gräfenhainichen; he
was a composer of many Lutheran hymns.  He was born in 1607, and lived through
the Swedish invasion of 1631, led by Gustavus Aldolphus.  In 1632, the body of
the king was carried from Lützen to Sweden through Gräfenhainichen.  On Easter
day, April 11, 1637, the Swedes came to Gräfenhainichen, demanded money, and
after receiving it, burned the town to the ground.  That same summer, 322
residents of the town died from plague.  These events helped shape the hymns
composed by Gerhardt.  (This information comes from a book by William Dallmann
on Paul Gerhardt published by Concordia, St. Louis.)  It is ironic that one of
Dan's Swedish ancestors named Lind, according to family history, was with
Gustavus Adolphus when he died, and might have marched through Gräfenhainichen
in 1632.

We must also have relatives in Raguhn, which is a town near Gräfenhainichen.
Emilie Mathilda Theresa Kinne gave me a photo of a woman and her daughter,
produced by a photographer in Raguhn, with ``Zum Andenken an meine
Konfirmation, Mutti und Brigitte'' written on the back.  No one knows who these
people are, but the phone book lists several Seelemann (or Seelmann) families
in Raguhn today.  Someone should call all of them, and ask whether they have
any family members interested in the family tree.  Are there any Zanders in
Raguhn?  Could Mutti be Marie Knittel?  Could Marie Knittel's mother be one of
the Zander children?

Janice Lind has a gorgeous quilt from Emilie, black on the back, made of silk
and velvet.  Inscriptions on the squares say: "June 14, Amada Kramer", "Emilie
Reichenbach, Geb I, 19 Juni, 1865", "D J S Norfolk", "M K", "D R", "A K", "E
R", "S P", "A", "S", and "Maria Treband, 1887".  Who are all those people?


Carl Alwin Wilhelm KINNE

Never married.


Johanna Henrietta Amanda KINNE

Born Oct 29, 1890, in Burnside, Iowa.  Baptized December 7, 1890, in Trinity
Lutheran Church, Dayton, Iowa.  Confirmed March 2, 1904, in Trinity Lutheran
Church, Dayton, Iowa.  Known as Jennie.  She was the church organist at
Trinity Lutheran for many years.  Died March 16, 1962, at the Lutheran
Hospital in Fort Dodge.  Buried in Dayton, Iowa.  Never married.


Alma Sophia KINNE

Born at home in Burnside, Iowa, on Dec 29, 1896.  She attended the parochial
school of Trinity church until her confirmation Mar.~20, 1910.  Following her
confirmation she attended Fort Dodge Business college, from which institution
she graduated with the class of 1916.  Some time later she entered the Nurses
Training school of the Lutheran hospital at Hampton, and finished training in
1921.  For some years she successfully followed her chosen profession in
various states, cheering the patients and those with whom she worked by her
comforting words, gracious smiles and ready wit.  As it became evident that
the profession of nursing was too heavy for her, she attended the Northwest
Institute of Technology at Minneapolis, Minn., and graduated in 1929.
(Janice Emilie Lind still has her golden graduation pin with a tiny
microscope on it.)  She then became a laboratory technician and assistant
superintendant at the hospital in Atlantic, Iowa.  She died at 4:50 Saturday
afternoon, Oct 5, 1929, at that hospital.  Death followed an operation
performed several days before for the relief of an obstruction of the bowels,
for which she had submitted to several operations in the past.  She had been
a long time sufferer from a condition which surgery was inadequate to remedy.
She had been employed at the local hopsital for three months.  Buried in
Dayton, Iowa.  Never married.


Jarius Greenwood BRIDGHAM

src: Joel Bridgham


Elizabeth E. VALENTINE

src: Joel Bridgham


Jarius Greenwood BRIDGHAM

src: Joel Bridgham

Elmer G. Bridgham says he died young.


Martha CHATTERLY

Picture of her with Edward in family archives, no more information.

Susan Williams email 4/5/07 gave me Martha's last name (which is likely
a married name) and said Martha's daughter Lucy and Lucy's husband Charles
emigrated to the US and were living with Martha and Edward at
269 Hamilton Ave. Paterson City, Passaic County, New Jersey
in the 1930 census.  Also, according to Susan, "Edward and Martha made many trips back to England to visit family, Martha had other children still living in Wigan."


1930 census shows her living in Paterson with Edward.